Sudan: US supports south Sudan’s independence

The United States has pledged technical and financial support for the referendum of an independent South Sudan amidst fears that civil war, ethic and religious differences, and totalitarianism constitute a direct threat to the future survival of millions of southern people, southern Sudan authorities have said.

During his third day visit in Kenya the US vice president Joe Biden has said the United States will give technical and financial support for the referendum of an independent South Sudan.The US Vice President urged Southerners to immediately begin negotiations on post-referendum arrangements with Khartoum in tackling unresolved issues such as border demarcation, revenue sharing, and citizenship rights.

Biden said the US will continue to assist in the professionalization of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army in recognition of the serious threats to security faced by the South.

Amidst fears that civil war, ethnic and religious differences, and totalitarianism constitute a direct threat to the future survival of millions of southern people, Biden said the US will continue to assist in the professionalization of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army in recognition of the serious threats to security faced by the South.

The U.S Vice President Biden met and discussed the referendum due next year with President of Southern Sudan Salva Kiir in Nairobi capital, Kenya.

Kiir won elections in April to become the first elected president of Southern Sudan. And he is expected to lead the semi-autonomous south to independence. The elections were part of a peace deal that ended a 21-year civil war between the north and south.

The people of South Sudan will most likely choose to break away from the Arab dominated north and have their own state either through the referendum or unilaterally, a former US special representative to the State Department for Sudan said.

Sudan is overtly divided into an Islamic north and a Christian south with more than 400 different languages and dialects spoken among Sudan’s 597 ethnic groups.

Southern Sudan wanted independence from Egypt but Northern Sudan wanted a union between Egypt and Sudan, showing no intention of sharing power with the African south.

Civil war between the north and south broke out in 1955 and continued after Sudan became an independent nation in 1956. Fighting continued until 1972, as policies forcing the south to adopt Arab culture, Arab language, and the religion of Islam, Sudan’s ties to Egypt and Saudi Arabia only intensified.

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